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Feb 10, 2019

Welcome to episode 19 of VegasTMI- the official city of Las Vegas podcast. In this episode we talk about an exciting downtown enhancement project called Project Enchilada.

City of Las Vegas Communications Director David Riggleman sits down with Executive Director of Community Development Tom Perrigo and City Attorney Brad Jerbic to talk about the project that will bring green, open space, illumination and overall stabilization to East Fremont Street from Las Vegas Boulevard to 14th Street.

Project Enchilada will bring green, open space, illumination and overall stabilization to East Fremont Street from Las Vegas Boulevard to 14th Street. We are working in collaboration with the local business owners and land owners to bring a spark of energy and eventually additional commerce to the area. In some cases restoring the facades to their original luster and in others working with the owners and tenants to understand their future needs, so the infrastructure will be complementary to it. This “new life” will be achieved by the refurbishing and restoration of some of the nostalgic neon signs in the area, the opening up of the much needed and anticipated green space and restoration of some of the business facades bringing life, energy and vibrancy to the area.

Here are three things we heard on the podcast:. You can listen to the entire episode here.

This project is the whole enchilada

The project refers to the refurbishment of 12 square miles downtown; the boundaries are Main Street to Eastern Avenue and U.S. 95 to Charleston Boulevard. It’s the heart of downtown and the project focuses on restoring old neighborhoods and cultural icons. It’s not any one piece but restoring many aspects of downtown that make the project unique. That’s how it got its name: Project Enchilada

Neon signs are being restored and re-illuminated

It’s clear that there are very few places left where we can honor the 50s and 60s iconic days of neon. The original signs are still there. We are taking an $800,000 grant from the Centennial Commision to restore these signs back to their original grander.

Trees will become a major focus

We know that 100 years ago, trees were mandatory because we didn’t have air conditioning. Our Public Works department has really changed the model to put in trees that will thrive and provide shade. This will make the area more walkable and inviting, even in the summer.

You can read more about Project Enchilada here.